An existential threat and nostalgia as a nostrum

What Congress is intentionally doing these days poses an existential threat to the federal judiciary, not to mention our beloved Nation. That is not an exaggeration.

As I obsess about the madness in Washington, and looking for some solace, my thoughts turn nostalgic. I fondly recall practicing law in Lexington, a small Nebraska county seat town served by excellent lawyers and judges who were even better human beings. Here are some photos showing the solidity of the past that now give me some faint hope for the future. I have no idea why this is so except to say that the mind works in mysterious ways.

The Dawson County Courthouse is a historic two story redbrick courthouse building set on a raised basement of Bedford limestone which in turn is set upon a base of marble from Carthage, Missouri It is located at 700 North Washington Street, between 7th and 8th streets in Lexington, Dawson County, Nebraska. Designed by William F. Gernandt in the Beaux Arts style of architecture, it was built between 1913 and 1914. The courthouse and the entire block it sits on The Dawson County Courthouse is a historic two story redbrick courthouse building set on a raised basement of Bedford limestone which in turn is set upon a base of marble from Carthage, Missouri It is located at 700 North Washington Street, between 7th and 8th streets in Lexington, Dawson County, Nebraska. Designed by William F. Gernandt in the Beaux Arts style of architecture, it was built between 1913 and 1914.

The Dawson County Courthouse in Lexington, Nebraska is a two story redbrick courthouse building set on a raised basement of Bedford limestone which in turn is set upon a base of marble from Carthage, Missouri. It was designed by William F. Gernandt in the Beaux Arts style of architecture. In 2013, the structure turns 100 years old. The courthouse and the entire block it sits on is registered with the National Register of Historic Places. Photo credit (for this image and the following images in this post) Ammodramus per Wikimedia Commons license.

Civil War memorial to the Grand Army of the Republic in front (west) of the Dawson County Courthouse in Lexington, Nebraska.

Civil War memorial to the Grand Army of the Republic in front (west) of the Dawson County Courthouse in Lexington, Nebraska.

West (main) entrance of Dawson County Courthouse. I must have walked up those steps and through the doors more than a thousand times.

West (main) entrance of Dawson County Courthouse. I must have walked up those steps and through the doors more than a thousand times.

RGK

4 responses

  1. Richard, I too remember the first courthouse where I went to 43 years ago to practice my trade as a court reporter when judges loved their court reporters (some loved them too much – married them) not like today where some judges have little use for us as – and that’s just the way it is – other forms of technology are replacing us by actually beating some of us at our own game! My personal opinion is those 30 or so whacko birds, really are Al-Qaeda extremists in disguise. Osama Bin Laden must be smiling from time to time in his hell where he belongs. Hopefully the American voters, the little people will on November 2014 figuratively annihilate them from their existence in Washington. The Republican Party I predict is a party that will go down with these whacko birds as Chris Matthews calls them on Hardball. Who knows what major changes the United States District Court is going to have to accept as its new standard of dispensing justice. It’s definitely not going to be pretty. I suspect many Article III judges who are now on the brink, who have quietly kept their cards close to the chest, will announce in the short months to come that they are returning to private practice and more and more cases criminal cases will be heard by magistrates who for the most part are well qualified to hear all kinds of cases but don’t because of only not having the political clout to know the right Washington politicians.

    TSH

  2. Steve,

    Much (but, of course, not all) of what you write resonates with me. You and I are old enough to remember the old saying that “you get what you pay for.”

    All the best.

    RGK

  3. That is a beautiful courthouse and I can understand why you enjoyed climbing those steps while on the way to work. The description mentions Bedford limestone. That limestone is from the area in southern Indiana where I grew up. Many important buildings have Bedford limestone. The campus of Indiana University in Bloomington has many limestone buildings, which contribute to the historic feeling of that school. I think that using Bedford limestone was a mark of quality construction, so it is reassuring that your hometown courthouse has Bedford limestone. Elaine Mittleman

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