Warning: Arrest warrant scam

I just received warning from Washington. It is reproduced below.

RGK

Warning! Arrest Warrant Scam

You’ve received a warrant by fax or email saying a federal law enforcement officer or an attorney for the government wants to arrest you. Charges may be for money laundering or bank fraud, or missed jury duty. To avoid arrest, the warrant says, send money.

It’s a scam.

The warrants may display a bogus logo of an unspecified “United States District Court,” a case number, and various charges. Typically, recipients are instructed to call a number to get a “settlement” or to wire money to avoid arrest.

The warrant is phony. A valid warrant would not be served by fax or e-mail. It would be served in person by a U.S. Marshal or other law enforcement officer.

Anyone receiving a fake arrest warrant should contact the FBI or the district U.S. Marshals Office. If there is any question regarding the authenticity of a warrant, contact your district clerk of court.

The fake arrest warrants have been reported across the country, including in the District Courts for the Southern District of Ohio, Southern District of Illinois, New Mexico, Western District of Kentucky, Utah, the District of Columbia, and throughout Florida. Anyone demanding or obtaining money or anything of value while impersonating an officer or employee of the United States may be fined and/or imprisoned up to three years.

 

7 responses

  1. “Anyone demanding or obtaining money or anything of value while impersonating an officer or employee of the United States may be fined and/or imprisoned up to three years.”

    Only 3 years? This is one case where the penalties should be increased substantially. Impersonating a federal official, particularly a law enforcement agent of officer, strikes at the basis of government: it’s credibility among the populace. Such conduct deserves a harsh response.

  2. Who sends a fake warrant trying to extort money to a federal judge?

    I have heard some dumb criminal stories, but that’s up there.

  3. Who sends a fake warrant trying to extort money to a federal judge?

    Nobody. That’s not how these scams work. It’s part of a mass blast, and if they get 1 hit out of 500,000, they’re making serious profit. Our judge just got himself onto the wrong mailing list. Prolly all those times related to the PRC and Great Britain.

    Shortly after Gaddafi was murdered, I got an email from one of several Mrs Gaddafis who said she needed to move $8M right damn now because her life was in danger. If only I helped her move the bucks (supplying appropriate account information in support of the effort), she’d give me a serious taste of the goods.

    It’s not a high cost operation to move emails; the positive response rate only needs to be (barely) measurably greater than zero.

    What’s sad is that warnings like the Judge’s actually are necessary.

    Eric Hines

  4. Peter H.,

    I don’t think the scam is directed only at judges but lots of other people too! That’s why I sent the warning out.

    All the best.

    RGK

  5. Oh, I’m sure the idiots sent it to a ton of e-mail addresses. I just figured they’d be at least smart enough to filter for .gov email addresses. But, y’know, criminals.

  6. It sounds a lot like the FBI virus. On your screen appears an official looking message with the FBI logo telling you you’ve been to all sorts of bad sights and are risking arrest. If you pay via credit card some amount, you will not be arrested. The virus freezes your computer. My computer guy told me a lot of people pay, thinking they’re caught going to porn sites, etc. I got hit with it once via a news site I go to. I had to get my hard drive wiped clean to get rid of it.

  7. It sounds a lot like the FBI virus. On your screen appears an official looking message with the FBI logo telling you you’ve been to all sorts of bad sites and are risking arrest. If you pay via credit card some amount, you will not be arrested. The virus freezes your computer. My computer guy told me a lot of people pay, thinking they’re caught going to porn sites, etc. I got hit with it once via a news site I go to. I had to get my hard drive wiped clean to get rid of it.

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