Once more unto the breach but briefly

There is a race to get to the Supreme Court again on the ACA. This time the question is whether covered individuals get a subsidy if they bought the insurance on an exchange created by the federal government for a state because the state elected not to do so. The issue is purely one of statutory construction. Linda Greenhouse, who is generally not my favorite commentator, has a good explanation of this race here.

Remember my post on the Hobby Lobby case? ┬áIn that post, I suggested that the Supreme Court should be more attentive to Alexander Bickel’s “passive virtues.” This most recent ACA argument–fought out now in the D.C. and Fourth Circuits–gives the Supreme Court an opportunity to live up to Bickel’s advice. Here’s how:

  • Every time a Circuit court changes the status quo–rules for the ACA opponents–the Supreme Court should stay the case. ┬áRemember, as Bickel would, that a ruling against the ACA frustrates the will of the people as expressed by Congress, even though Congress passed the law with the narrowest of margins.
  • The Supreme Court should not take any ACA case on the federal vs state exchange issue until every Circuit court has ruled. There is no harm in waiting since a stay and the status quo would mean simply that insurance buyers would continue to get the intended subsidy and the opponents suffer nothing but the opportunity to make their statutory construction argument as quickly as they would like. There is even the possibility that the Court could avoid the question entirely if Congress, in the interim, cleared up the alleged statutory ambiguity.

Delay, delay, delay should be the mantra of the Court. Since both conservative and liberals, to their shame, now endorse the idea that law is merely politics by another name, the Court should do everything in its power to push back hard against such bilge. The world will not fall apart if the Supreme Court takes a “wait and see” attitude that lasts several years. More time to nap is almost always a good thing.

RGK

%d bloggers like this: