Casual cruelty

Yesterday, while in Omaha, I was to sentence a guy in a drug case. He was going to do a lot of time. We got all the way through the sentencing process save for the defendant’s opportunity to speak. When the defendant spoke, the first thing he said was “I don’t feel so well” or words like that. He was sweating profusely, he seemed shaky, and he appeared to be nauseous..

He said he had not been given his medications at Douglas County Corrections. The US Marshals had delivered the fellow’s medication to Douglas County when they transported the guy from the Diagnostic and Evaluation Center (D&E) at the state prison the day before. The fellow apparently had herniated discs that required surgery, and he was evidently anxious and depressed.

The fellow kept apologizing to me about being sick. He wanted to be sentenced. He wanted to get to a Federal Medical Center for a thorough work-up. He had no apparent motive to delay sentencing.

When I asked the US Marshals what had happened, they advised that Douglas County Corrections (where we “store” prisoners in Omaha) won’t administer medications prescribed at other correctional institutions like D&E (where we also “store” prisoners) until Douglas County Corrections is independently satisfied that the prisoner needs the medications. Until then, the prisoner does not get the medication. In this case, there was no weaning him off the medications–Douglas County Corrections simply refused to give him the stuff at all. I suppose they would have gotten around to the medication issue at some point.

I suggested that this seemed silly since the Nebraska Department of Corrections, the entity that operates D&E, is far more sophisticated than a county jail and Douglas County Corrections could probably trust the State of Nebraska that the drugs were necessary. The US Marshals, who are, in my experience, both humane and professional, replied that it was not their policy that had deprived this man of his medications. Indeed, they had done absolutely everything they could to see that he got his prescribed drugs including hand delivering them to Douglas County Corrections.

I don’t like┬ásentencing people to prison when they are sick. That is particularly so when their sickness results from the┬ácasual cruelty of correctional bureaucrats. So, I continued sentencing. No big deal.

RGK

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