Apophenia

My Chief Judge, the brilliant and especially literate Laurie Smith Camp, noted in a comment yesterday that I am “gifted” with Apophenia.  Apophenia is the experience of seeing patterns or connections in random or meaningless data. Although Laurie did not say so, it is frequently an artifact of mental illness according to the German shrink who first thought about it.

Following the maxim “play to your strengths,” here are five random but related (at least for me) questions that pricked my interest this morning:

1.  Why does Joan recycle the see-through sleeves that hold the two daily newspapers we receive each morning?

IMG_1366

2.  Would it make a difference if the folks in Congress sat in during 100 sentencings of hapless “kiddie porn” offenders whose offense is looking at the photos and sharing them with others of a similar persuasion but who are otherwise harmless and often productive citizens?

3.  What are the chances of a black girl educated at the University of Nebraska ending up as a New York Times senior editor?

Photo credit: Nebraska Magazine. LaShara Bunting, New York Times Senior Editor

Photo credit: Nebraska Magazine. LaShara Bunting, New York Times Senior Editor

4.  Who figured out that an Amaryllis can defeat winter?

photo

5.   If you really care about writing, why haven’t you read Jim Harrison’s A Prairie Prologue in Nebraska, New York Times (January 2, 2015)?*

Photo credit:    joannaviyukkane.tumblr.com. James "Jim" Harrison is an American author known for his poetry, fiction, reviews, essays about the outdoors, and writings about food. Best of all, he looks like I feel.

Photo credit: joannaviyukkane.tumblr.com. James “Jim” Harrison is an American author known for his poetry, fiction, reviews, essays about the outdoors, and writings about food. Best of all, he looks like I feel.

RGK

*H/t Michael K. Ausbrook. For more about Michael, see here.

%d bloggers like this: