Posner on Case Workloads & Making Judges Work Harder

Professor Collins has another post in his series on Judge Posner entitled Posner on Case Workloads & Making Judges Work Harder that you ought to read. In general, Posner thinks that judges don’t work hard enough. Specifically, in this post, Posner is described putting questions to a lawyer from the bench in a real case about the workload of Administrative Law Judges in the Social Security Administration.* The exchange between counsel and the judge are interesting.

I have previously written about the work of the SSA. The nearly one million case backlog is scandalous.  But I don’t think that the fault is with the ALJs. Unlike Judge Posner, I think ALJs in the Social Security system have so many cases that they can’t do their jobs very well, although most of them in my experience try hard.**

Whatever one thinks of the SSA and the dispute it has with the ALJs, Posner’s hard-headed views about the workload of judges is refreshing. Those views are worth considering, and Professor Collin’s piece gives you that opportunity. By the way, I would be very interested in hearing from those lawyers who have social security disability practices about whether they think ALJs have too many cases.

RGK

* According to Professor Collins,

The Plaintiffs were members of the Association of Administrative Law Judges (all administrative law judges). They filed a complaint contesting a Benchmarks and Directive issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA) imposing an agency-wide requirement that SSA administrative law judges (ALJ) decide 500-700 cases per year. The ALJs alleged that SSA had imposed an illegal quota on them and thus violated their right to decisional independence under the Administrative Procedures Act. The District Court granted the Defendant’s motion to dismiss on the grounds that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction.

**Remember that federal district judges review SSA appeals from denial of benefits. At least in my chambers, SSA appeals are among our least favorite line of work. See here.

H/t How Appealing.

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