Posner on Case Workloads & Making Judges Work Harder

Professor Collins has another post in his series on Judge Posner entitled Posner on Case Workloads & Making Judges Work Harder that you ought to read. In general, Posner thinks that judges don’t work hard enough. Specifically, in this post, Posner is described putting questions to a lawyer from the bench in a real case about the workload of Administrative Law Judges in the Social Security Administration.* The exchange between counsel and the judge are interesting.

I have previously written about the work of the SSA. The nearly one million case backlog is scandalous.  But I don’t think that the fault is with the ALJs. Unlike Judge Posner, I think ALJs in the Social Security system have so many cases that they can’t do their jobs very well, although most of them in my experience try hard.**

Whatever one thinks of the SSA and the dispute it has with the ALJs, Posner’s hard-headed views about the workload of judges is refreshing. Those views are worth considering, and Professor Collin’s piece gives you that opportunity. By the way, I would be very interested in hearing from those lawyers who have social security disability practices about whether they think ALJs have too many cases.

RGK

* According to Professor Collins,

The Plaintiffs were members of the Association of Administrative Law Judges (all administrative law judges). They filed a complaint contesting a Benchmarks and Directive issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA) imposing an agency-wide requirement that SSA administrative law judges (ALJ) decide 500-700 cases per year. The ALJs alleged that SSA had imposed an illegal quota on them and thus violated their right to decisional independence under the Administrative Procedures Act. The District Court granted the Defendant’s motion to dismiss on the grounds that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction.

**Remember that federal district judges review SSA appeals from denial of benefits. At least in my chambers, SSA appeals are among our least favorite line of work. See here.

H/t How Appealing.

Posner pisses off plenty of people on privacy

Entitled “On Privacy, Free Speech, & Related Matters — Richard Posner vs David Cole & Others,” Ronald K.L. Collins has this post at “Concurring Opinions.” As I frequently do, I tip my hat to Howard Bashman at How Appealing.

What is most interesting to me about this piece on Posner is not the judge’s provocative statements suggesting that privacy is far less important than national security. What is really interesting to me is the shocked and vituperative reaction he received as a result. See, e.g., here (Nick Gillespie) and, for an especially tough piece, here (Glenn Greenwald). Posner is not much of a romantic when it comes to privacy and free speech, and that apparently makes some folks froth at the mouth.

Image credit: disinfo.com

Image credit: disinfo.com

I don’t agree with a lot of what Judge Posner has to say on privacy and free speech. That said, perhaps I have signed too many search warrants for electronic data and Title III interception orders for wiretaps and bugs, but I pretty much agree with him on one point. We should not fear the government scooping up too much information in pursuit of crime or in furtherance of the national security. On the contrary, we should fear that a risk averse government will seek to scoop up too little.* However, reasonable people can certainly disagree, and that value judgment is not as simple as Judge Posner seemingly thinks.

As an aside, I bet Posner and I see the world in the same, almost paranoid, terms and that accounts for our agreement on this point. Why that paranoia does not extend to the government is a question for which I don’t have much of an answer. For myself, all I can say is that I try to be a good German.

Anyway, Professor Collins once again does a wonderful job helping us understand the brilliant Judge Posner and, this time, the judge’s views on privacy and free speech. I encourage you to read this most recent piece.

RGK

*You would be fascinated to know about the government’s technological capacity to listen in on anyone anywhere. You would also be impressed (and maybe depressed) by how hard it is for the government to get the judicial authority to do so. Having said that, I have had only indirect involvement with national security matters as compared with far more experience in criminal cases. In short, I am only slightly better informed on government snooping for national security purposes than the man or woman on the street.

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